Wednesday, February 10, 2016

I Can Relate!


I've discovered something during my first week of reading adult literature for my Adult Literature Month. I'm an adult...and so I can relate to these adult books. Go figure! I know, I know. It's nothing profound but I love reading adult books because the issues the character's are dealing with are so relateable.

See, I love YA but I can't exactly relate to falling in love with two boys who may or may not have supernatural abilities and just not being able to decide which one I want to be with forever and ever! I can't relate to going to high school (any more) and being bullied or going to parties or dances. Yes, I remember being a teenager. So, reading YA is like a trip down memory lane; a bit of nostalgia. But when I can connect with a character who's dealing with issues I might very well be dealing with...well, there's just something so wonderful about it. 

I read a book this month with a character who was struggling with fertility issues. I have fertility issues too so I could totally relate! It was like the author had secretly followed me around and was able to read my innermost thoughts and feelings and then write about them. It was heartbreaking and comforting at the same time to know that this character wasn't based on me but on the thousands of other woman out there just like me. And we all feel the same. So, yes, it was sad but I felt understood and validated in my sometimes crazy thinking. 

So,yeah. I like these adult books. (mostly contemporary literature) They are relatable and isn't that what we all love in a good book? Being able to relate to a character? It's not impossible in YA but it's a heck of a lot easier in adult books cause, well, I'm an adult.

What says you? Have you noticed this too or do you still completely relate to YA and think I'm an old, stodgy, fuddy duddy? 

17 comments:

  1. I totally agree with you. I love MG and YA books, but I relate best to adult literature for the exact reason you stated -- it deals with issues that I'm dealing with at the moment or issues I've dealt with in the past or issues I'll probably deal with in the future. Glad you've found the same thing in the books you've been reading this month.

    P.S. I know a little bit about infertility, too. It sucks. Sorry, friend :(

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    1. Yeah, it's nice being able to relate.

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  2. If I'm reading contemporary, then it's nice to relate to the characters and what they're going through. But, I don't like contemporary very much because I don't want to read about every day life. I want to escape. So, whether it's YA or Adult, it's not a big of a deal to me because I want those supernatural characters and fantasy-driven plots. I hope that makes sense.

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    1. Totally. Sometimes I really don't want to relate. I want escape.

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  3. I read both YA and Adult... I think YA is more of a fun read, and that I do relate more to the Adult books.

    I first read Stephen King's book It when I was in the 6th grade. The book features a group of friends, as children and then as 30 something or other adults. For the longest time, I related to the kids in the book best. Even as a teenager and young adult, the grown up characters seemed so ADULT and foreign. But I re-read again a year or so ago, and now I'm 30 something and it was completely different. I still loved the Loser's Club as kids, but I could relate to their adult struggles in a way that I couldn't before.

    I'm glad you're finding books to relate to- I also have fertility issues, which the Hubs and I have come to terms with after 13 years, but it's nice to see the subject talked about in books. I have a lot of friends that have fertility issues, which growing up and reading romance I never, ever saw. It seemed characters in books got pregnant all the time, it didn't really prepare me well.

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    1. I love your Stephan King story. How cool is that? Yeah, it's becoming more popular to talk about real issues like infertility. It's sad but a good thing.

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  4. That's really great and one good reason to read adult literature. If I found a book I could relate to, I would be so happy, too. I really haven't, though, since I'm particularly weird. (I did relate to some aspects of Fangirl, but not the whole of it. It was like relating to my old college self a bit.)

    Usually, I read in order to escape, so needing to relate really well isn't necessary. I love to explore characters and relationships that are unusual or just interesting.

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    1. Me too. Escape is often necessary. Sorry you haven't been able to find a book you relate too.

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  5. I'm starting to find myself more connecting to adult literature over YA as well! I still can't stand books about women in their 40s who have kids etc. (because I'm not at that stage in my life yet), but I really find myself being drawn to characters in their 20s and 30s, and am starting to roll my eyes at some of the YA out there.

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    1. It's funny how that happens, huh? I can't relate to all adult books but the ones I can relate to hold a place in my heart.

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  6. Hmmmm. . . perhaps I should read more adult books. I love YA as well, but I'd love to read stories about adult women I could relate to. Lots to think about.

    Sorry about your infertility problems. I didn't know you guys were struggling with that. If you ever need to vent about it or anything, we can have girls night!

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    1. Aw, thanks, Kami! I think your reading is very balanced. More so then me.

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  7. I don't read a lot of YA but when I do it's more of a "brain break" thing. Some can be challenging and well-written but the vast majority of what I've read is somewhat looser in writing style, so it's relaxing to read. But, yeah, not all that relatable.

    I'm sorry about your fertility issues. I've known many, many people who've gone through that struggle -- including my parents, actually: it took them 10 years to conceive, back in the days when people expected you to return from your honeymoon pregnant. That was always a sore spot for them, even after they had the two of us.

    As to the concept of relating to characters in adult novels, I know how you feel. Finding books in which a character is going through the same kind of challenge you're experiencing is amazingly helpful. It just makes you feel a little less alone, I guess.

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    1. Yeah, it's not easy explaining your feelings to people who don't struggle with infertility issues.
      YA is definitely a break for my brain. I must need a lot of breaks because I sure read it a lot.

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  8. I love a lot of YA, but I have a hard time with certain aspects like the high school setting. I just can't relate to that anymore.

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  9. You are most definitely NOT a stodgy fuddy-duddy! :) I do know how you feel though. I love to read YA, but it's a rare book that I totally relate to a character. I think I'm much like you, it's more of a trip down memory lane. Or actually! Now that I think about it, it's really more of trip down dream lane. My teen life was pretty run of the mill, minus any boyfriends or boy friends really. Nothing much exciting happened either, so maybe what I like about YA is more the dream of an idea of what teen life could have been like. If I were a fictional character. :)

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